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  • FOURTH EDITION OF JHR-AUCC’S HUMAN RIGHTS MAGAZINE

    A whole classroom full of students and lecturers went silent when a Paramount Chief from the Volta Region told how his sister got sick during the rainy season. She was in need of a doctor. But the road from Wli Todzi through the mountain to the nearest hospital was very hard to take. When they finally arrived the next morning, she had died. This is just one out of many sad stories the citizens of Wli Falls can tell about their infrastructure. ‘Women, children and elders are the most vulnerable to get injured traversing the dangerous paths down the mountains’, said Chief Torgbe Agbenoto III. He came especially to AUCC for the launch of the human rights magazine that published stories about the difficulties in his region. This new edition is the result of months of hard work by participants of the program, Journalists for Human Rights (JHR) - AUCC Chapter. The first seminar started in 2007 with the aim of training them in becoming active mediators in society. About seven hundred students are now  members of the program. With their research, writing and  editorials, they raise issues that concern communities, no matter how far away or deprived they may be, often  with some success. When officials in Accra didn’t answer the urgent call about the sorry state of roads in the mountains of the Volta Region, Wli Todzi’s Chief brought his concerns to the young journalists. Moreover, the students took the story to big media platforms like Joy FM and the Daily Graphic, thus compelling government to listen and act.


    This week’s launch of the JHR-AUCC’s magazine was chaired by lecturer Seth Oppong, who asserted that human rights are not a new or a foreign subject in Ghana. In the eighteenth century, the Ghanaian philosopher Anton Wilhelm Amoo went to Germany and wrote a dissertation about human rights. ‘In his legacy we continue’, said Oppong. The launching ended with an auctioning that excited the visitors when magazines were sold for 20, 50, 100 and even 200 Ghana Cedi’s. Among the highest bidders was the Paramount Chief himself. With the sale of their publications the students finance their work for JHR-AUCC.

    The fourth edition holds follow-ups about the health threat at Ga Mashie, the legal situation with violators at Old Fadama and educational improvements for the community at Ada and Songor Lagoon. The magazine can be bought here at the school. There is more about the program at Facebook: Journalists for Human Rights A.U.C.C. Chapter.

  • FOURTH EDITION OF JHR-AUCC’S HUMAN RIGHTS MAGAZINE

    A whole classroom full of students and lecturers went silent when a Paramount Chief from the Volta Region told how his sister got sick during the rainy season. She was in need of a doctor. But the road from Wli Todzi through the mountain to the nearest hospital was very hard to take. When they finally arrived the next morning, she had died. This is just one out of many sad stories the citizens of Wli Falls can tell about their infrastructure. ‘Women, children and elders are the most vulnerable to get injured traversing the dangerous paths down the mountains’, said Chief Torgbe Agbenoto III. He came especially to AUCC for the launch of the human rights magazine that published stories about the difficulties in his region. This new edition is the result of months of hard work by participants of the program, Journalists for Human Rights (JHR) - AUCC Chapter. The first seminar started in 2007 with the aim of training them in becoming active mediators in society. About seven hundred students are now  members of the program. With their research, writing and  editorials, they raise issues that concern communities, no matter how far away or deprived they may be, often  with some success. When officials in Accra didn’t answer the urgent call about the sorry state of roads in the mountains of the Volta Region, Wli Todzi’s Chief brought his concerns to the young journalists. Moreover, the students took the story to big media platforms like Joy FM and the Daily Graphic, thus compelling government to listen and act.


    This week’s launch of the JHR-AUCC’s magazine was chaired by lecturer Seth Oppong, who asserted that human rights are not a new or a foreign subject in Ghana. In the eighteenth century, the Ghanaian philosopher Anton Wilhelm Amoo went to Germany and wrote a dissertation about human rights. ‘In his legacy we continue’, said Oppong. The launching ended with an auctioning that excited the visitors when magazines were sold for 20, 50, 100 and even 200 Ghana Cedi’s. Among the highest bidders was the Paramount Chief himself. With the sale of their publications the students finance their work for JHR-AUCC.

    The fourth edition holds follow-ups about the health threat at Ga Mashie, the legal situation with violators at Old Fadama and educational improvements for the community at Ada and Songor Lagoon. The magazine can be bought here at the school. There is more about the program at Facebook: Journalists for Human Rights A.U.C.C. Chapter.

  • FOURTH EDITION OF JHR-AUCC’S HUMAN RIGHTS MAGAZINE

    A whole classroom full of students and lecturers went silent when a Paramount Chief from the Volta Region told how his sister got sick during the rainy season. She was in need of a doctor. But the road from Wli Todzi through the mountain to the nearest hospital was very hard to take. When they finally arrived the next morning, she had died. This is just one out of many sad stories the citizens of Wli Falls can tell about their infrastructure. ‘Women, children and elders are the most vulnerable to get injured traversing the dangerous paths down the mountains’, said Chief Torgbe Agbenoto III. He came especially to AUCC for the launch of the human rights magazine that published stories about the difficulties in his region. This new edition is the result of months of hard work by participants of the program, Journalists for Human Rights (JHR) - AUCC Chapter. The first seminar started in 2007 with the aim of training them in becoming active mediators in society. About seven hundred students are now  members of the program. With their research, writing and  editorials, they raise issues that concern communities, no matter how far away or deprived they may be, often  with some success. When officials in Accra didn’t answer the urgent call about the sorry state of roads in the mountains of the Volta Region, Wli Todzi’s Chief brought his concerns to the young journalists. Moreover, the students took the story to big media platforms like Joy FM and the Daily Graphic, thus compelling government to listen and act.


    This week’s launch of the JHR-AUCC’s magazine was chaired by lecturer Seth Oppong, who asserted that human rights are not a new or a foreign subject in Ghana. In the eighteenth century, the Ghanaian philosopher Anton Wilhelm Amoo went to Germany and wrote a dissertation about human rights. ‘In his legacy we continue’, said Oppong. The launching ended with an auctioning that excited the visitors when magazines were sold for 20, 50, 100 and even 200 Ghana Cedi’s. Among the highest bidders was the Paramount Chief himself. With the sale of their publications the students finance their work for JHR-AUCC.

    The fourth edition holds follow-ups about the health threat at Ga Mashie, the legal situation with violators at Old Fadama and educational improvements for the community at Ada and Songor Lagoon. The magazine can be bought here at the school. There is more about the program at Facebook: Journalists for Human Rights A.U.C.C. Chapter.

  • FOURTH EDITION OF JHR-AUCC’S HUMAN RIGHTS MAGAZINE

    A whole classroom full of students and lecturers went silent when a Paramount Chief from the Volta Region told how his sister got sick during the rainy season. She was in need of a doctor. But the road from Wli Todzi through the mountain to the nearest hospital was very hard to take. When they finally arrived the next morning, she had died. This is just one out of many sad stories the citizens of Wli Falls can tell about their infrastructure. ‘Women, children and elders are the most vulnerable to get injured traversing the dangerous paths down the mountains’, said Chief Torgbe Agbenoto III. He came especially to AUCC for the launch of the human rights magazine that published stories about the difficulties in his region. This new edition is the result of months of hard work by participants of the program, Journalists for Human Rights (JHR) - AUCC Chapter. The first seminar started in 2007 with the aim of training them in becoming active mediators in society. About seven hundred students are now  members of the program. With their research, writing and  editorials, they raise issues that concern communities, no matter how far away or deprived they may be, often  with some success. When officials in Accra didn’t answer the urgent call about the sorry state of roads in the mountains of the Volta Region, Wli Todzi’s Chief brought his concerns to the young journalists. Moreover, the students took the story to big media platforms like Joy FM and the Daily Graphic, thus compelling government to listen and act.


    This week’s launch of the JHR-AUCC’s magazine was chaired by lecturer Seth Oppong, who asserted that human rights are not a new or a foreign subject in Ghana. In the eighteenth century, the Ghanaian philosopher Anton Wilhelm Amoo went to Germany and wrote a dissertation about human rights. ‘In his legacy we continue’, said Oppong. The launching ended with an auctioning that excited the visitors when magazines were sold for 20, 50, 100 and even 200 Ghana Cedi’s. Among the highest bidders was the Paramount Chief himself. With the sale of their publications the students finance their work for JHR-AUCC.

    The fourth edition holds follow-ups about the health threat at Ga Mashie, the legal situation with violators at Old Fadama and educational improvements for the community at Ada and Songor Lagoon. The magazine can be bought here at the school. There is more about the program at Facebook: Journalists for Human Rights A.U.C.C. Chapter.

  • FOURTH EDITION OF JHR-AUCC’S HUMAN RIGHTS MAGAZINE

    A whole classroom full of students and lecturers went silent when a Paramount Chief from the Volta Region told how his sister got sick during the rainy season. She was in need of a doctor. But the road from Wli Todzi through the mountain to the nearest hospital was very hard to take. When they finally arrived the next morning, she had died. This is just one out of many sad stories the citizens of Wli Falls can tell about their infrastructure. ‘Women, children and elders are the most vulnerable to get injured traversing the dangerous paths down the mountains’, said Chief Torgbe Agbenoto III. He came especially to AUCC for the launch of the human rights magazine that published stories about the difficulties in his region. This new edition is the result of months of hard work by participants of the program, Journalists for Human Rights (JHR) - AUCC Chapter. The first seminar started in 2007 with the aim of training them in becoming active mediators in society. About seven hundred students are now  members of the program. With their research, writing and  editorials, they raise issues that concern communities, no matter how far away or deprived they may be, often  with some success. When officials in Accra didn’t answer the urgent call about the sorry state of roads in the mountains of the Volta Region, Wli Todzi’s Chief brought his concerns to the young journalists. Moreover, the students took the story to big media platforms like Joy FM and the Daily Graphic, thus compelling government to listen and act.


    This week’s launch of the JHR-AUCC’s magazine was chaired by lecturer Seth Oppong, who asserted that human rights are not a new or a foreign subject in Ghana. In the eighteenth century, the Ghanaian philosopher Anton Wilhelm Amoo went to Germany and wrote a dissertation about human rights. ‘In his legacy we continue’, said Oppong. The launching ended with an auctioning that excited the visitors when magazines were sold for 20, 50, 100 and even 200 Ghana Cedi’s. Among the highest bidders was the Paramount Chief himself. With the sale of their publications the students finance their work for JHR-AUCC.

    The fourth edition holds follow-ups about the health threat at Ga Mashie, the legal situation with violators at Old Fadama and educational improvements for the community at Ada and Songor Lagoon. The magazine can be bought here at the school. There is more about the program at Facebook: Journalists for Human Rights A.U.C.C. Chapter.

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